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IFCO – Celluloid Junkies 2011

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Last night I had the pleasure of attending the Independent Filmmaker’s Co-operative of Ottawa (IFCO) 19th annual gala, Celluloid Junkies.  IFCO is an artist-run centre that assists its members in cultivating the art of traditional film-making using Super 8, 16mm and/or 35mm films, hence the reference to celluloid for this year’s gala.

If you live in the Ottawa area, and haven’t checked out this annual event, you’re missing out on a opportunity to experience a different side to this oft-labeled sleepy city.  You’ll experience the work of some talented filmmakers, some of whom are presenting their work for the first time to an audience.  All the films are unique and are testaments to the individual spirits of each of the filmmakers .  They’ll be films that will stir base emotions, such as joy and sadness.  They’ll be other films that will make you uncomfortable with their content and themes.  And, there will be films that will leave you so perplexed that you’ll feel like your mind has just been on an all-night bender and it woke up next to some stranger.  Guaranteed though – you will experience something different than your usual Saturday night out at the movies.

With the advent of digital media consuming the film-making industry, artists such as those found exhibiting their work at IFCO’s gala,  are rebels protecting a threatened art form from slipping into obscurity.  I’m quick to support artists that are brave enough to hone a craft that takes, I’d argue, a lot more patience than its modern derivative.  Working in this medium also isn’t cheap.  It’s substantially more expensive than working in digital formats; however it seems to me that there is more raw honesty and integrity in these films than in some of the digital counterparts I’ve seen.

I also fully support the rise of digital films, but I think it’s important for consumers and future artists to stay connected to the roots of the art form.  Inexpensive and easy-to-use digital cameras have made it such that anyone can easily record, edit and screen (via the Internet) a film.  This fast and easy approach should make movie goers, and movie makers, all the more appreciative of artists, such as the IFCO group.  These folks nurture and keep alive the predecessor to modern day film-making that has made everyone a critic, director and producer. Clearly, there is something extremely valuable in keeping a piece of history alive.  We learn to understand where we’ve come from and the strives and struggles made in making art more accessible to the masses (whether that’s a good thing is entirely another discussion).

Kudos to the staff, volunteers and artists at IFCO on another memorable evening of films!  This chick can’t wait to see you next year!

Cheers!

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  1. April 17th, 2011 at 14:46 | #1

    Glad you enjoyed it and came out!

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